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Paracetamol Medication Availability

Our chronic pain sufferers have enough to deal with managing their medical condition.
This proposal if it goes ahead as outlined will seriously impact the availability of safe pain killers relied on by so many.
All chronic pain suffers need to be made aware and raise our voices how these proposals may impact them
A proposal to restrict the sale of paracetamol products like Panadol is likely “scaring” the millions of Australians who rely on these products to get through their daily lives, according to one advocacy group.

A committee of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) met on Wednesday to consider feedback from public consultation on limiting the sale of

products.

 

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/the-sale-of-paracetamol-could-soon-be-restricted-this-is-scaring-chronic-pain-sufferers/yyfwspexa

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Catastrophizing – how to stop making yourself depressed

It is easy when you are coping with chronic pain to see the worst scenarios in everything around you.

Your mind sets off on a flight of fancy and before you know it, the sky has fallen and all hope is gone.

Mental responses can be retrained to reduce the impact on mental health and quality of life.  Learn how to recognised the signs.

Emma McAdam is a licenced marriage and family therapist who uses her therapy skills and psychological research to create bite sized nuggets of help.

You can access her full library here with many short videos which may help you cope.

 

– YouTube Emma McAdam – Therapy in a Nutshell

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Pain and me – Tamar Pincus

This video provides a wonderful visual depiction of a personal interpretation of acceptance of chronic pain created by Professor Tamar Pincus.

Tamar Pincus is a Professor in Health Psychology at The University of Southampton, where she is also Dean of the faculty of the environment and life sciences. Until 2022 she was a Professor and Executive Dean at Royal Holloway, University of London. She has led the Research Centre for the study of Pain and Well-Being at Royal Holloway. Her research spans experiment approaches to explore psychological mechanisms in pain, observation studies to measure risk over time, trials to test effectiveness, and qualitative work, to examine the thoughts and beliefs of people living with pain and those who are part of their life. Examples include investigations of cognitive biases in people living with pain; the psychological predictors for poor outcome in low back pain, and the study of clinicians’ beliefs and behaviours and their effect on patients with pain, especially in reference to effective reassurance and return to work.

 

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Biopsychosocial Model and Occupational Therapy

Pete Moore runs the Pain Toolkit organisation in the UK and talks in this session about biopsychosocial occupational therapy.

This conversation is  with Bronnie Thompson, who is an occupational therapist.  Bronnie talks about how an OT can help a person dealing with chronic pain, manage their day to to day lives, incorporating psychology and physiotherapy and pain management.

It is an important issue which often gets overlooked.

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The Dialectic of Pain: Synthesizing Acceptance and change

Dr. Deborah Barrett offers a framework and tools to help people improve their quality of life, just as they are, while also reducing pain and suffering. Her work draws from empirically based cognitive and behavioral interventions, and she practices what she preaches every day.

We thank the FPA for the great work they are doing publishing webinars in this field.

Watch the webinar here

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How to Support a Partner with Chronic Pain

The question is often raised at our support group meetings – how can I support my partner with chronic pain.  It is so hard to watch someone you love cope every day with debilitating pain.

Oh if only you had a magic wand.  How many of us go to bed thinking, “maybe tomorrow they will wake up and the pain will be gone”.

Oh course always have hope, but while we wait for a miracle or a treatment that works for our partners particular circumstances, what can we do?

Supporting a partner or loved one with chronic pain is difficult. Whether you’re having to cope with the transition from being pain free, or entering into a relationship with someone suffering from an existing condition, you’re still going to have to learn a whole new set of skills if you’re going to make the best out of what can at times be a difficult situation.

15 Ways To Support A Partner With Chronic Pain

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How to Exercise with Chronic Pain

Recent research has found that 50% of Australians are living with a disability.

Let that sink in……1 in every 2 people are coping with some sort of disability….

Sufferers of trigeminal neuralgia are very well aware that they are coping with a condition that is not visible to many others.  It must come as a shock to see stats that so many people in our society are dealing with illness.

So what can we all do to protect ourselves and help us live life to the fullest

The below link is part of information to support the ABCs Your Move series of programs

https://www.abc.net.au/everyday/experts-on-how-to-exercise-with-chronic-pain/101534976

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Loving yourself isn’t easy when chronically ill

Our Association connects to other chronic illness individuals via our Twitter account.  Some have trigeminal neuralgia, however many have other conditions.

What is the same though, are the struggles that anyone with a condition that causes chronic pain, can relate to.

We have to be kind to ourselves at all times, even when our bodies refuse to play nice.

The following blog was written by Rhiann who has been diagnosed with long-standing brain stem lesion and spastic paraparesis.

We hope her insights help to manage your journey with chronic pain

Loving Yourself Isn’t Easy When Chronically Ill

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MLS Treatment Therapy

So what is MLS Treatment Therapy, and how can it help sufferers of trigeminal neuralgia?

What is a Multi Wave Locked System?

The Multiwave Locked System (MLS®) is a new patented LLLT system that combines 905nm pulsed emissions with 808nm continuous emissions.I

It was developed by ASA Laser to help overcome some of the limitations on previous LLLT systems. The aim is to produce simultaneous actions on pain, inflammation and oedema. With the MLS® system it is possible to achieve strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oedema and analgesic effects simultaneously and in a short period of time.

The unique synchronised laser beam delivers a balance of the two wavelengths and powers providing safe and effective delivery. The optical design of the delivery system transfers energy up to 3 – 4 cm deep to effect tissue at a cellular level. The synchronised wave results in a synergistic effect where both the analgesic and anti-oedema effects are greater than if two single lasers had been used.

Research suggests for lasting effects from MLS Laser you will likely require 5-6 treatments depending on how your condition responds. Often you will experience a noticeable improvement after just 2 treatments.

For further information about the technology please See Here

This technology has been utilised for a number of years and research has been undertaken  Successful treatment for neuropathic pain with MLS®: a case study.

Some clinics use different terminology, however the MLS is used to deliver the treatment.

How does it work?

MLS Laser Therapy is a medical breakthrough therapeutic device with unparalleled applications and treatment outcomes. The laser works by converting light into biochemical energy, resulting in normal cell function, which causes symptoms (PAIN) to reduce significantly.

The primary biological action of PBM (MLS) Therapy results from stimulation of cellular transport mechanisms in the mitochondria, cell membranes and epithelial tissues. This action causes the release of vasodilating chemicals, the stimulation of DNA and RNA (building blocks) synthesis, an increase in enzyme production, normalisation of tissue Ph and increased ATP production (healing of the cells from the inside).

 

10 BENEFITS OF MLS LASER THERAPY

  1. Anti-inflammatory: MLS Laser Therapy has anti-oedema effect as it causes vasodilation, but also because it activates the lymphatic drainage system which drains swollen areas. As a result, there is reduction in swelling caused by bruising or inflammation.
  2. Analgesic: MLS Laser Therapy has a beneficial effect on nerve cells, it blocks pain transmitted by these cells to the brain which decreases nerve sensitivity.  Also, due to the decreased inflammation, there is less oedema and less pain.  Another pain blocking mechanism involves the production of high levels of pain killing chemicals such as endorphins and enkephalin from the brain and adrenal gland.
  3. Accelerated Tissue Repair and Cell Growth: Photons of light from the laser penetrate deeply into tissue and accelerate cellular reproduction and growth.  The laser light increases the energy available to the cell so the cell can take on nutrients faster and get rid of waste products.  As a result of exposure to laser light, cells are repaired faster.
  4. Improved Vascular Activity: Laser light will significantly increase the formation on new capillaries in damages tissue which speeds up the healing process, closes wounds quickly and reduces scar tissue.  Additional benefits include acceleration of angiogenesis, which causes temporary vasodilation and increase in the diameter of blood vessels.
  5. Increases Metabolic Activity: MSL Laser Therapy creates higher outputs of specific enzymes, greater oxygen and food particles loads for blood cells.
  6. Trigger Points and Acupuncture Points: MLS Laser Therapy stimulates muscle trigger points and acupuncture points on a non-invasive basis providing musculoskeletal pain relief.
  7. Reduced Fibrous Tissue Formation: MLS Laser Therapy reduces the formation of scar tissue following tissue damage from cuts, scratches, burns or surgery.
  8. Improved Nerve Function: Slow recovery of nerve functions in damaged tissue can result in numbness and impaired limbs.  Laser light speeds the process of nerve cell reconnection and increase the amplitude of action potentials to optimise muscle healing.
  9. Immuno-regulation:Laser Light has a direct effect on immunity status by stimulating immunoglobulins and lymphocytes.  Laser emissions are absorbed by chromophores (molecule enzymes) that react to laser light.  Upon exposure to the laser, the enzyme flavomononucleotide is activated and starts the production of ATP (adenosine-triphosphate), which is the major carrier of cell energy and the energy source for all chemicals reactions in the cells.
  10. Faster Wound Healing: Laser light stimulates fibroblast development in damaged tissue. Fibroblasts are the building blocks of collagen, which is the essential protein required to replace old tissue or to repair tissue injuries.  As a result, Laser Therapy is effective post surgically and in the treatment of open wounds and burns.

An interesting  in depth article covering every thing you need to know about MLS laser treatment in America, the history, the believers, the skeptics, the medical profession, the politicians and the people who use it

 Does it really work – blog

Pain clinics around Australia are now using this technology see below for examples – please note we do not recommend providers and suggest you discuss any new treatment options with your medical practitioners.

Introducing MLS Laser Therapy The first of its kind on the Central Coast

 

MLS Laser Therapy

Latest Technology

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How to Help People With Chronic Pain or Illness

This article was written by Liz the owner of the Despite Pain Blog .  The article contains links to other content that you may find useful.

Liz suffers from scoliosis (a curvature of her spine) when she was about ten years old. Initially, the orthopaedic surgeon said it was a cosmetic problem and no surgery was needed. But it wasn’t just a cosmetic problem. It started causing chronic back and rib pain when she was a teenager. The scoliosis worsened and when she was eventually referred to see a specialist, he could do nothing to help. Her pain continued to worsen, became constant and eventually, when she was 28, she had to retire from work.

Her back pain was chronic and disabling, but she lived with another pain condition that is just as debilitating. Trigeminal neuralgia, which causes severe facial pain. For an unknown reason, the trigeminal nerves in her face send pain signals to her brain.

In 2017, she was also diagnosed with the autoimmune condition, coeliac disease.

She has lived with chronic pain for most of her life, but try’s to keep smiling.

Click here to find out more about Liz.

10 Suggestions on How to Help People with Chronic Pain or Chronic Illness

If you have a friend or relative who lives with chronic pain or a chronic illness, the following suggestions are ways in which you could possibly provide physical help and support.

1. Believe Them

Believing them is the most important and supportive way to help people with chronic pain or illness.

Believe them when they tell you about their pain or illness. Believe them if they tell you that their life is difficult and that they’re struggling to cope. Believe them when they say their pain is off the charts. Believe them when they say they feel depressed. Please, never doubt them.

They need your empathy and understanding and that starts by letting them know that you believe them.

2. Listen to Them

Listen to them. Really listen.

If you ask them how they are feeling, please listen to the answer. There’s no point in asking otherwise.

Tell them that you are there if they want to vent. Many people feel they can’t or shouldn’t do that so tell them that you don’t mind listening.

They might say they’re fine when you know they’re not. So say, “I know you say you’re fine, but it’s okay to be honest with me.” If they still say they’re fine, don’t push it. Some people simply don’t like talking about their health or they might not be in the mood for opening up.

Never repeat what they tell you – if they feel comfortable enough to talk to you, don’t betray them by repeating what they say to others. You’ve gained their trust so don’t lose it.

3. Learn About Their Condition

Try to learn about their condition and how it affects them so that you understand more. I’m not suggesting you need to learn enough to obtain a medical degree, but if you learn a little bit, it will let them see that you are actually interested rather than being there out of a sense of duty.

4. Empathise

Empathise with them, but don’t tell them you know exactly how they feel. You might get an occasional bad headache, but that’s not the same as living with trigeminal neuralgia or chronic debilitating migraines. Even if you suffer from the same condition, everyone’s experience is different so, in reality, you don’t really know exactly how they feel. Empathise and tell them that you appreciate that their life can’t be easy.

5. Be There

Living with chronic pain or chronic illness can be a lonely life. Sometimes people just need a friend so give them your time.

They don’t need or want to talk about their pain or illness all the time. They don’t want pity or sympathy. Nor do they want to be treated with kid gloves and they do not expect you to be a nursemaid. They want to feel normal, do normal things and have normal chit-chat with you.

They need distractions from their health. You could share a meal with them, help them with a hobby or just sit with them to play a board game or enjoy a movie together. You could take them for a drive, go for a walk or take them shopping if they’re able. If you do this, please go at their pace so they don’t feel as though they’re holding you back, otherwise they will feel guilty. Talk about other things, including yourself. Talk about your own troubles if you have any because they still care about what’s going on in your life.

6. Help with Appointments

Offer to take them to their medical appointments. They might need your help getting there or they might be grateful for some moral support or an extra pair of ears during the appointment.

7. Offer Practical Help

Living with chronic pain or illness is debilitating, therefore simple tasks are often more like huge, possibly impossible, chores. They might be grateful for your help with some basic housework, making a meal or doing some shopping. Or perhaps you could help by picking their kids up from school or walking their dog occasionally.

But be tactful about how you offer your help as it may be construed as criticism.

For example, don’t tell them that their house needs to be cleaned. Instead, tell them that you realise that some chores must be extremely difficult due to their pain or illness, and you’d be happy to help out with something they find too difficult.

Try to offer help in a way that it’s easier for them to accept. For example, say, “I will be at the supermarket tomorrow, so it will be easy to pick up some shopping for you while I’m there.” That way, they know that you are already going to the supermarket, so you aren’t going out of your way just for them.

Offer help but try to understand if your kind offer is turned down. They might feel embarrassed, or they may still want independence so if they repeatedly say they don’t need or want your help, accept that and back off. Rather than be upset or take offence, simply tell them that you’re there if they ever need you.

8. Be Inclusive

When people are living with pain or illness, they might not be well enough to attend social events but please invite them anyway. They might not be well enough to come to your birthday party or to meet for coffee, but they also don’t like to feel excluded, so invite them and let them decide.

If they say yes, they might have to cancel or leave early due to their illness getting in the way. If that happens, don’t take it personally. Try to understand that it’s out of their control and accept that their health can be unpredictable. They are probably embarrassed and annoyed with themselves, so a little understanding will go a long way.

9. Don’t…

There are a lot of things you shouldn’t do or say. Here are a few:

    • Please don’t abandon them. Their pain or illness might get in the way, but they still value and want the relationship they have with you.
    • Never suggest that they shouldn’t take their medication or that they take too much. If you have a serious concern that it could be making them ill, suggest they speak to their doctor.
    • Don’t insinuate that they can’t be trying hard enough by telling them that your amazing friend has the same condition but is able to do so much more than them.
    • Don’t minimise their pain or illness by saying things like, “Well, it could be worse…” or “At least it’s not cancer.”
    • Don’t be dismissive of their symptoms or feelings and don’t tell them how
    • they should feel. Their pain or illness is real. Their feelings are real and valid.
    • Never suggest that they just need to give themselves a shake, pray a bit harder, go for a brisk walk or be more positive in order to feel better. Statements like that undermine them and their condition. They are also patronising and extremely rude.
    • Avoid suggesting strange herbal concoctions which are advertised online. Most of those strange herbal concoctions are expensive snake oil cures.
    • And please don’t suggest that they drink a kale and turmeric smoothie to cure their ills. If you do, you might get said smoothie tipped over your head.

10.Bring Chocolate

Unlike kale and turmeric smoothies, chocolate is nearly always welcome. So, bring on the chocolate. Or cake. That works too.