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Catastrophizing – how to stop making yourself depressed

It is easy when you are coping with chronic pain to see the worst scenarios in everything around you.

Your mind sets off on a flight of fancy and before you know it, the sky has fallen and all hope is gone.

Mental responses can be retrained to reduce the impact on mental health and quality of life.  Learn how to recognised the signs.

Emma McAdam is a licenced marriage and family therapist who uses her therapy skills and psychological research to create bite sized nuggets of help.

You can access her full library here with many short videos which may help you cope.

 

– YouTube Emma McAdam – Therapy in a Nutshell

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Loving yourself isn’t easy when chronically ill

Our Association connects to other chronic illness individuals via our Twitter account.  Some have trigeminal neuralgia, however many have other conditions.

What is the same though, are the struggles that anyone with a condition that causes chronic pain, can relate to.

We have to be kind to ourselves at all times, even when our bodies refuse to play nice.

The following blog was written by Rhiann who has been diagnosed with long-standing brain stem lesion and spastic paraparesis.

We hope her insights help to manage your journey with chronic pain

Loving Yourself Isn’t Easy When Chronically Ill

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A research on quality of life score (QOLS) of patients with trigeminal neuralgia

A research on quality of life score (QOLS) of patients with trigeminal neuralgia

When I visit my medical professionals they always ask questions in order to be sure of the diagnosis, and to be sure the treatment they recommend is appropriate to me personally.

I have discovered the following article which may interest you.

While it contains scientific language and in parts may be difficult to work through, you can read at the end before the list of references, a list of questions with the words for a five point rating system. There are some questions on that list that I am going to remember so when I visit my GP or Neurologist or Neurosurgeon I need to provide the answers, even if not asked – because I believe it may make a difference and help them help me.  Perhaps you might feel this way.

The article, ‘A research on quality of life score (QOLS) of patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN)’ written by Yejiao Luo, Mingjie He, Chenjun Li, and Hongya Yang and published in the

Journal of infection and Public Health Vol. 12 Issue 5  September–October 2019, Pages 690-694,

Quality of life research

Article by Helen Tyzack