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3.2 Microvascular Decompression: Attacking the Root of the Problem

FACIAL PAIN: A 21st CENTURY GUIDE For People with Trigeminal Neuralgia Neuropathic Pain 3.2 Microvascular Decompression: Attacking the Root of the Problem by Kenneth F. Casey, MD [Kenneth F. Casey MD FACS is a Past-President of the Medical Advisory Board of the American Facial Pain Association. He is an Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and Physical […]
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Member Story – Gail Wells

Gail is a member of our Facebook group and she shares her story Hi there! I firstly developed pain behind my left eye. Debilitating pain! Unbearable pain, it was around 4.00am, and it woke me up with a vengeance. Two weeks previously, I had experienced cataract surgery and my first thought was that for some […]
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Nerve Combing – Dr Jeremy Russell

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Early in 2022, a member of the TNAA Medical Advisory Board, Melbourne based Dr Jeremy Russell offered a webinar to Tasmanian TN sufferers. During his presentation he explained how he had conducted some ‘combing’ of the trigeminal nerve as a treatment to stop pain.This 2000 article addresses a few matters associated with nerve combing.
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Trigeminal Neuralgia – Chronic Pain Meditation

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As a Trigeminal Neuralgia sufferer have you though about using Chronic Pain Meditation

When a Trigeminal Neuralgia sufferer experiences pain flares which are hard to deal with,  it may be worthwhile taking some time for yourself and using a meditation tool to help reduce anxiety and stress and hopefully will also result in a  reduction in the pain felt.  It is so important to use a holistic approach to chronic pain

“This meditation for chronic pain uses relaxation, breathing exercises and guided imagery with one goal in mind, to produce your body’s natural relaxation response to counteract the effects of stress and reduce pain. Relaxation techniques are safe for anybody to use and do not have the side effects of pain medication.”

Any opinion expressed or information provided in/with this email is not a substitute for medical advice.  Always contact your doctor or other medical professional if you have a question concerning your or another’s health.

 

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Canadian Case Study – Can Chiropatric Treatments Reduce Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain

The management of pain as a Trigeminal Neuralgia sufferer is constantly being considered

Treatments other than medication can include meditation, relaxation tecniques and manipulation performed by a chiropractioner

It can be bewildering working out which approach to take, especially when pain levels are high

The attached study has been produced by The Journal of the Canadian Chiropractic Association

The study is a long read but provides a good assessment of whether chiropractic interventiins can reduce pain

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2921783/

 

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Trigeminal Neuralgia – Explanation

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If you like your Trigeminal Neuralgia explanations about the cause, medication and treatments a little more medical,  spend 5 minutes watching this video, it is clear in its description, explanation and information

You may think you know everything there is to know about Trigeminal Neuralgia, but watching presentations from different sources may provide you better insight or something you hadn’t considered before

 

 

 

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Trigeminal Neuralgia – The Most Painful Disease Known To Man

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The most painfull illness known to man, rare, and diagnosis can sometimes take far too long

This may be the best use of 6 minutes getting an overview of what pain sufferers of Trigeminal Neuralgia have to go through

 

 

 

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Member’s Story – Helen Tyzack

In 2005, while having lunch with the man who was about to become my ex-husband, I took a quick violent intake of breath, my eyes widened, and I sat stunned and perplexed. I had just received the first searing ‘lightning’ strike in the area of my upper teeth. Moments later, when my wits returned, I […]
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Stanford’s Facial Pain Program – Whole Person Pain Care: Latest research and scalable treatments for pain and opioid reduction

Here at TNA Australia we link with International Organisations who deal with Trigeminal Neuralgia and other Facial Pain conditions

We have registered to be provided with information about Webinars and Research from many of these providers.  One of the unexpected wonderful outcomes of the COVID pandemic is the way many International and National Organisations have pivoted and now provide access to presentations and webinars over the web.  It is sensational to be able to be in an audience listening to skilled professionals on a wide array of subject, while sitting at home.

Why not get a few people together to view the presentation and have a chat about what you have learnt, share a coffee and cake together and workshop how you can utilise the advise in your lives

If you get a few friends and family together, take a photo and send it to members@tnaaustralia.org.au and we will publish here.

Our new website is our portal to our members and people looking for information – we add content regularly on subjects we feel may be of interest.  We are not sponsored by any other organisation and we do not endorse the content – it is provide to assist you to make decisions for your individual circumstances 

Stanford’s Facial Pain Program presents:

Whole Person Pain Care: Latest research and scalable treatments for pain and opioid reduction

Wednesday, March 9, 2022 5:30pm Pacific Time

Thursday , March 10, 2022 12.30pm Sydney Time

 

Speaker:  Dr. Beth Darnall, PhD – Associate Professor, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

Beth Darnall, PhD is Director of the Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab. She leads NIH and PCORI-funded clinical trials that broadly investigate behavioural medicine for acute and chronic pain, including $19M in research funding from the Patient Centred Research Outcomes Institute (PCORI). Her primary interests are developing and investigating novel pain treatments that are scalable, effective, and low burden.

Dr. Darnall twice briefed the U.S. Congress on the opioid and pain crises, and provided invited testimony to the FDA on iatrogenic harms associated with opioid tapering. In 2020 she joined the NIH Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee as a scientific member. From 2020-2021 she served as a scientific member of the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) Opioid Workgroup of the Board of Scientific Counsellors of the National Centre for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC/NCIPC).

Her work has been featured in outlets such as The New York Times, Scientific American, NPR Radio, BBC Radio, and Nature. In 2018 she spoke on the psychology of pain relief at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.

Register

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Chronic Pain and Anxiety: How to Cope

Managing Anxiety is very important when you suffer  chronic pain from Trigeminal Neuralgia

The following article was written by Kathleen Smith, PhD, LPC and has some helpful advice

Is your chronic illness causing you to suffer from chronic anxiety? Do you feel like you have no control of your body OR mind? Follow these tips on how to cope when your chronic pain causes anxiety

If you’ve been diagnosed with a chronic illness, you may feel as if you have no control over your future. The stress of learning to navigate the medical world, cope with physical changes, and manage daily life can often lead to excessive worry or panic.

Researchers have found that experiencing a chronic illness puts a person at increased risk for developing anxiety or an anxiety disorder. Roughly 40% of people with cancer report experiencing psychological distress that often takes the shape of excessive worry or panic attacks.  People with chronic pain are three times more likely to develop symptoms of anxiety.

Even long after a diagnosis, the daily demands of living with a chronic illness can continue to present challenges and generate anxiety. Loss of mobility or other abilities can lead to worry about safety, employment, or financial independence. Depending on others or engaging in sexual intimacy may also be concerns. Some are more easily able to adapt to the changes in their lives. Others may feel overwhelmed with anxiety and struggle to cope.

Fortunately, anxiety is treatable with therapy, medication and complementary and alternative treatments (i.e. acupuncture). But when the focus is on the chronic illness, anxiety is often overlooked. That’s why it’s important to talk to your doctor about your emotional and cognitive health, and to speak up when you experience

Signs of Anxiety in Patients with Chronic Illness

  • Excessively worrying about physical health
  • Trouble sleeping due to worry
  • Having nightmares about physical health
  • Experiencing panic attacks about prognosis
  • Difficulty discussing physical condition
  • Avoiding treatments that cause anxiety
  • Avoiding social interactions
  • Having intrusive thoughts about dying
  • Becoming irritable about physical health
What You Can Do

Challenge negative thinking.  When you’re anxious, your brain may jump to conclusions, assume the worst, or exaggerate. Catastrophizing and ignoring the positives in your life may occur when you live with the challenges of a chronic illness.

One way to manage anxiety is by being aware of the negative thinking, examining it and challenge the irrational thoughts.

Counselors/therapists can play an important role in teaching you this important coping skill.

Calm your mind.  Relaxation techniques can be an effective way to calm anxious thinking and direct your mind to a more positive place. Consider whether mindfulness meditation, yoga, or other breathing and focusing practices can still your body.

Taking  time to relax, increases your ability to think objectively and positively when it comes to making choices about your health and life.

Find a good prescriber. If you take medication for both mental and for physical health, it’s important to that your doctors are aware of all your medications. Some medications may actually escalate anxiety, so it’s essential to work with a prescriber who can make informed choices that address both conditions without worsening either.

Find a support group. Managing a chronic illness can be a lonely job as it may be difficult for loved ones to understand the unique challenges.

Support groups are wonderful for creating community but also for providing information that can help reduce worry. They can also connect you to valuable resources for treating your illness. Check with your local hospital or community center to find a local group. You can also search the Internet for online support.

Recruit the right team. Patients benefit the most when chronic illness and psychological distress, such as anxiety, are treated with a team of people who communicate regularly. Doctors, pain specialists, psychiatrists, counselors, occupational therapists, and physical therapists are among those who can help you create and implement a treatment plan for your physical and mental health.

Acknowledge successes. Anxious thinking about chronic illness can keep you from feeling that you have control over anything in life. It’s important to acknowledge all successes, both big and small. Keep track of the healthy things you do for your mind and body. Exercising, going to counseling, spending time with a friend–these can all help. Keeping these successes at the front of your mind can help you combat worry. They can remind you that you do have the power to affect your present and future.

If you think that you might have anxiety in addition to chronic illness, be honest with your doctor. Ask for help. Anxiety is highly treatable