Newsletter – July 2016

The July 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed to our members.

This edition contained:

  • A message urging for the continuation of the TNAA, supported by a committee President and Secretary when the current caretaker roles conclude.
  • The minutes of the TNAA Annual General Meeting held on 4th June 2016 in Sydney.
  • Details of a memorial donation to the TNAA.
  • Report summary – TN Differential Diagnosis / Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgias by Associate Professor Arun Aggarwal.
  • A report from our Mackay, Gold Coast, Adelaide and Melbourne support group meetings. This contained a summary of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.

AGM 4 June 2016

The Annual General Meeting of Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia Inc was held on 4 June 2016 at the Sydney Mechanics School of Arts – Mitchell Theatre at Level One, 280 Pitt St, Sydney.

The following members will serve on the TNAA committee for the next 12 months.

President – Irene Wood
Vice president – Kathy Meredith
Treasurer – Angelo Trovato
Secretary – Mary Milanovic
Committee Member – Suat Cheng Lee
Committee Member – John Pickup

Newsletter – June 2016

The June 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed to our members.

This edition contained:

  • A special message by the outgoing president of the TNAA, Irene Wood, reflecting on support the association has provided to people touched by trigeminal neuralgia.
  • Details of the discounts available in the Entertainment Book, a fundraising initiative of the TNAA.
  • Report summary – Bacteria, Gut Organisms Linked To Health, Autism, Schizophrenia, Depression, Diabetes, Allergies And Obesity by Xavier La Canna
  • Report summary – Opening paths to novel analgesics: the role of potassium channels in chronic pain by Christoforos Tsantoulasemail, Stephen B. McMahon
  • A report from our regional conference in Adelaide with summaries of the presentations:
    • Dr Tom Wilkinson – The Overlap Of Symptoms Between Trigeminal Neuralgia And TMD And How To
      Make A Differential Diagnosis.
    • Prof Paul Rolan: Clinical Pharmacologist; Consultant Physician; Medicines Developer; Pain Physician
    • Dr Andrew Zacest: Neurosurgeon – Surgical Option Of Trigeminal Neuralgia
    • Dr Michael Conlon: Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Food & Nutrition – Gut Microbes and Human Health: How Your Diet Affects Your Microbes
  • A report from our Sydney support group meeting. This contained a summary of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.

We’re Fundraising with Entertainment Book

The Trigeminal Neuralgia Association of Australia is fundraising with the Entertainment Book in 2016.

The Entertainment Book comes with the Gold Card and vouchers, and contains over $20,000 worth of valuable ‘up to 50% off’ and ‘2-for-1’ offers for many of the best restaurants, cafés, arts, attractions, hotels, travel, shopping and much more.

Alternatively, The Entertainment Digital Membership puts the same value into your Apple or Android device, allowing you to conveniently search for special offers.

Editions are available for each Australian capital city and many regional areas.

The Book and Digital Memberships are on sale now at https://www.entertainmentbook.com.au/orderbooks/9s26962, ready to use from April, 2016.

20% of each membership sold directly supports our efforts to advocate for TN patients and empower our members with information and support.

Thank you for your support.

tnaa entertainment book

Newsletter – May 2016

The May 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed to our members.

This edition contained:

  • The obituary published in the New York Times, reflecting on the life of Dr. Peter J. Jannetta, Pioneering Neurosurgeon on Facial Pain, dying at 84.
  • Details of our AGM and Regional Conference on 4 June in Sydney.
  • The nomination form for TNAA executive committee positions.
  • Details of our fundraising initiative with Entertainment Books.
  • Report summary – Nonparalytic botulinum molecules for the  control of pain by Mangione, Antonina S.; Obara, Ilona;  Maiarú, Maria; Geranton, Sandrine M.; Tassorelli, Cristina;  Ferrari, Enrico; Leese, Charlotte; Davletov, Bazbek; Hunt,  Stephen P..
  • Details of the most common side effects of Lyrica.
  • Reports from our Brisbane, Sydney CBD and Melbourne support group meetings. These contain summaries of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.
  • Details of our Adelaide Regional Conference on 21 May 2016.

Newsletter – April 2016

The April 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed to our members.

This edition contained:

  • Irene Wood’s resignation letter from the role of President of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia.
  • Details of our fundraising initiative with Entertainment Books.
  • Report summary – Diet affects autoinflammatory disease via gut microbes.Trigeminal Neuralgia surgery by Kim J. Burchiel.
  • Report summary – pain management for the elderly by the World Health Organisation.
  • Reports from our Mackay, Gold Coast, Adelaide, Toongabbie, Sunshine Coast. These contain summaries of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.
  • The registration form for the regional conference on 21 May in Adelaide.

Newsletter – March 2016

The March 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed and/or posted to our members.

This edition contained:

  • Information about our upcoming conference in Adelaide.
  • Report summary – Trigeminal Neuralgia surgery by Kim J. Burchiel.
  • Report summary – pain management for the elderly by the World Health Organisation.
  • Reports from our Melbourne, Toongabbie, Brisbane and  Sydney CBD support group meetings. These contain summaries of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.

Newsletter – February 2016

The February 2016 Newsletter of the Trigeminal Neuralgia Association Australia has been emailed and/or posted to our members.

This edition contained:

  • Information about our Facebook page at http://on.fb.me/1lQfHZc
  • Report summary – Comparison of Tolerability and Adverse Symptoms In Oxcarbazepine And Carbamazepine In The Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Neuralgiform Headaches Using The Liverpool Adverse Events Profile (AEP)
  • Report summary – Carbamazepine and Folic Acid In  Trigeminal Neuralgia Patients
  • Our postal address has changed to PO Box 157, North Richmond NSW 2754, Australia.
  • Reports from our Sunshine Coast, Mackay, Sydney CBD, Adelaide, Gold Coast, Brisbane and Melbourne support group meetings. These contain summaries of the symptoms, challenges and remedies of attendees.

Exercise Is Good For the Brain

By:Jeanna Bryner, LiveScience Managing Editor

This article first appeared in the May, 2010 edition of the TNAA newsletter. To read our newsletter, please visit: Newsletters

Working out on a treadmill isn’t just good for the body, it’s good for the brain, according to a new study,the latest to weigh in on the cognitive benefits of exercise.
Regular exercise speeds learning and improves blood flow to the brain in monkeys, the study found. The researchers suspect the same would hold true for humans.

While there is ample evidence of the beneficial effects of exercise on cognition in other animal models, such as the rat, it has been unclear whether the same holds true for people, said study researcher Judy Cameron, a psychiatry professor at Pitt School of Medicine. Testing the hypothesis in monkeys can provide information that is more comparable to human physiology.
For one, monkeys exercise like people, in that they love getting on a treadmill (well sort of like us), and they won’t run all night as rats would do if provided with a running wheel, Cameron said.

“Second, monkeys, like people, have well-developed cerebral cortices and that is the part of the brain used in cognition. Rats have a much less developed cortex, so again monkeys are more analogous to people,” Cameron told Live Science.
Cameron and colleagues trained adult female cynomolgusmonkeys to run on a human-sized treadmill at 80 percent of their individual maximal aerobic capacity for one hour each day, five days a week, for five months. This regimen is equivalent to what is recommended for improving the fitness of middle-aged people.

Another group of monkeys remained sedentary, meaning they sat on the immobile treadmill, for a comparable time.
Half of the runners went through a three-month sedentary period after the exercise period. In all groups, half of the monkeys were middle-aged (10 to 12 years old) and the others were more mature (15 to 17 years old). Initially, the middle-aged monkeys were in better shape than their older counterparts, but with exercise, all the runners became more fit.
During the fifth week, the monkeys completed cognitive tests in which they had to choose which covered objects contained a food reward underneath. Monkeys that exercised were twice as fast at this task as those who didn’t exercise.

However, later in the testing period, learning rate and performance was similar among the groups, which could mean that practice at the task will eventually overshadow the impact of exercise on cognitive function, Cameron said.
Brain tissue samples revealed that mature monkeys that ran had a greater volume of blood vessels compared with middle-aged runners or sedentary animals. (These blood vessels deliver oxygen and nutrients to the brain.) But those blood flow changes reversed in monkeys that were sedentary after exercising for five months.

The results agree with previous studies in this area. A recent review highlighted that exercisers learn faster, remember more, think clearer and bounce back more easily from brain injuries, such as a stroke. Some of these brain benefits are thought to arise out of the mild stress that exercise induces, which triggers the brain to protect against neuron damage.
In addition, it could just be an effect of blood flow. “Physical exercise increases blood flow to the brain,” Cameron said. “Blood delivers nutrients and oxygen, and this may be a large part of why exercise increases cognitive function.”
She suspects the benefits could be two-fold for humans. “The monkeys were more alert and engaged as well as improved cognitive function in the first task they were tested in,” Cameron said. “We expect that people would show similar effects of exercise. In addition, if over time people are more alert and engaged it would be likely that they would learn more from that alone.

How to Live Well with Chronic Disease

by David S. Sobel M.D.
Mind Body Health : http://www.healthy.net

This article first appeared in the May, 2010 edition of the TNAA newsletter. To read our newsletter, please visit: Newsletters

To live well with chronic conditions you need to learn skills for managing three areas:
•Your illness and symptoms
•Your normal daily activities
•Your emotions

Managing Your Illness
Any illness is a learning experience. You may not even know you have a pancreas gland until you’re told you have diabetes. To manage a chronic illness, you need to become an expert in your disease. This doesn’t mean you become a doctor, but you need to learn enough about your condition and how your body reacts so you can take action to minimize disability and complications.

Be an Active Partner
Learn about your medical condition. What makes it worse or better? What action plan should you take if symptoms flare? What are the warning signs that you should get professional medical help? What can you expect from medical care and what must you do for yourself?

There may be specific skills you need to learn: how to measure your blood sugar if you are diabetic, how to properly use an inhaler if you have asthma, how to exercise safely with a heart or lung condition, (“how TN medication should be taken!” – Irene Wood)

Learn how to prepare for a medical visit – what questions to ask about medical tests, medications, and surgery.

Learn to Cope with Symptoms
Most chronic disease symptoms wax and wane. When symptoms are bad, take some consolation in knowing that “this will pass.” Learn and practice the proven techniques for dealing with pain, tension, depression, anxiety and insomnia.